CETIS-CH in use as a court cashier

Another industry can now take advantage of the automation of conventional cash systems with CETIS-CH. In some states, the conventional court cashier has been enhanced with self-service systems. The medium term is to replace the whole cash service with a self-service system. Another industry can now take advantage of the automation of conventional cash systems with CETIS-CH. In some states, the conventional court cashier has been enhanced with self-service systems. The medium term is to replace the whole cash service with a self-service system.

The handling of payments on court cashiers is up to this day an almost completely manual process. The cash will be manually deposited or paid out. The required documents and receipts are mostly created manually as well. Even card payments are not an integrated process, but require manual rework.

Basically all deposit and payout processes of a court cashier can be represented on a self-service system: payment of outstanding balances, installments, payout of refunds (i.e. reparations for witnesses and authorities) and many more.

Mainly, one can distinguish between two types of cashier processes:

  • In most of the cases, a conversation with the cash employee precedes the deposit or payout transaction. The employee starts an action, sets the amount payable and documents this in front of the customer on a receipt that is tagged with a bar code. The customer will scan this barcode on the self-service terminal. Then he will be prompted to pay the accordant amount, or a payment be initiated, respectively. Depending on the case, different receipts will be created, and even multi-receipts are possible.
  • There are also a couple of transactions, which can be started by the customer directly from the self-service system. This is the case when a payment, that precedes a transaction, is already known (for example: leaving the church). In these cases, the customer can select the transaction directly from the self-service system. The customer will be prompted to pay and, after successfully doing so, will receive a receipt, which gives further advice on the next steps. This saves a complete step for the customer and the court, compared to the conventional procedure.

Overview of functions

  • Deposits and payouts for bills and coins
  • Storage of money in integrated safes
  • Scalability in configuration and capacity
  • Support for ATMs and ATS’ for employees
  • Card payment-terminals integrated into the cash self-service system
  • Connection of different specialized procedures to visualize single business processes, or even multiple business processes at the same time
  • Individual design of dialogue-flow for every business process, tailored to the needs of a self-service solution
  • Presentation of additional information for the customer
  • Special functions for user groups
  • Business-process specific receipt print
  • Central management and monitoring of all connected systems via web app

A self-service solution, that should represent the entire functionality of a court cashier, must therefore be able to image both forms of processing. Otherwise integral interference into court processes would be needed. The use of CETIS-CH ensures this, since it includes both ways in its default range of activities.

Due to the heavily different organization of court cashier-processes in different states it is also required to easily change the core functions to existing process flows and to specialized administrative procedures that need to be integrated: One of the areas where CETIS-CH can fully excel.

Already applied and in use are the solutions for the state of North Rhine-Westphalia and Hessen. This solution was presented in September on the „EDV Gerichtstag“ (fair for IT in the justice system) in Saarbrücken. It earned a lot of positive feedback and interest from other states.

More service for customers

  • Independent from opening hours
  • Current balance of bills receivable, claims, etc. are always visible
  • Optimization of cash operations and the connected business operations
  • Reducing error-proneness
  • Constant, integrated processes, prevention of media translations (omission of manual work i.e. value determination, entry or document creation)
  • Ease of workload for desk and service-places, secure cash handling (more service for the customer, operational safety for the employees)
  • Support for receivables management
  • Prevention of teller differences, logging and journaling (security and profitableness)
  • Optimization of storage and further processing of collected cash

Contac: Thomas Vogel; Turn on Javascript!